I did a brief search on zinc importance GTFIH

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8875519 (this specifically was posted here already)
We studied the relationship between cellular zinc concentrations and serum testosterone cross-sectionally in 40 normal men, 20 to 80 y of age. In four normal young men (27.5 +/- 0.5 y), we measured serum testosterone before and during marginal zinc deficiency induced by restricting dietary zinc intake. We also measured serum testosterone in nine elderly men (64 +/- 9 y) who were marginally zinc deficient before and after 3 to 6 mo of supplementation with 459 mumol/ d oral zinc administered as zinc gluconate. Serum testosterone concentrations were significantly correlated with cellular zinc concentrations in the cross-sectional study (lymphocyte zinc versus serum testosterone, r = 0.43, p = 0.006; granulocyte zinc versus serum testosterone, r = 0.30, p = 0.03). Dietary zinc restriction in normal young men was associated with a significant decrease in serum testosterone concentrations after 20 weeks of zinc restriction (baseline versus post-zinc restriction mean +/- SD, 39.9 +/- 7.1 versus 10.6 +/- 3.6 nmol/L, respectively; p = 0.005). Zinc supplementation of marginally zinc-deficient normal elderly men for six months resulted in an increase in serum testosterone from 8.3 +/- 6.3 to 16.0 +/- 4.4 nmol/L (p = 0.02). We conclude that zinc may play an important role in modulating serum testosterone levels in normal men.



http://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/176660
Serum pituitary levels of growth hormone (GH), thyrotropin (TSH), prolactin (PRL), luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) were measured in sexually mature (adult) and sexually immature (juvenile) male rats who had been deprived of dietary zinc for 15 and 7 weeks, respectively. When compared to pair-fed control rats receiving a zinc supplemented diet, both the adult and juvenile zinc deficient rats had significantly lower body weights, tail lengths and ventral prostate weights. The testes of the sexually immature rats were also smaller than those of the pair-fed animals. In sexually mature, zinc deficient rats serum concentrations of GH and testosterone were significantly lower






Zinc and growth: (probably nor rellevant to most of people here because of fused growth plates)


http://www.researchgate.net/publication ... deficiency
We present here a 13-year-old boy with partial growth hormone deficiency due to chronic mild zinc deficiency. When zinc administration was started, his growth rate, growth hormone levels, and plasma zinc concentrations increased significantly......



http://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/176660
13 short children aged 7–13 years who had a retarded bone age and low hair zinc concentration (under 140 µg/g) were treated with oral zinc supplements for a year. There was a significant increase in the growth rate in the children whose hair zinc concentration increased. Growth hormone, testosterone and somatomedin C also increased after oral zinc supplementation. Data from 755 short healthy children who have attended our Growth Clinic are presented which describe their hair and serum zinc concentration at different ages. The data indicate a decline in hair zinc concentration after birth with a gradual increase at age 4–6 years, finally reaching adult normal levels after adolescence.



http://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/176575
A 14-year-old girl and a 13-year-old boy were found to be growth hormone deficient by insulin-arginine stimulation tests, and were also found to be zinc deficient.When oral zinc replacement was given, they both had a significant increase in growth rate which continued for at least 2 years, and subsequent growth hormone tests were normal.





(there so many studies and research about zinc effect on skin so I didn't even bother to search about it) [b]if your blood levels are already sufficient with zinc (no defeciency), additional supplementation will have no impact on you you just need to maintain it through diet or small dose. [/b] If you're deficient in zinc,you can supplement it. Ideally you should get zinc through our diet. in modern days it is quite not common because it is not found a lot in typical foods that most of us eat these days.


Dietary intake:
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Zinc increases testosterone and copper increases estrogen.


One of the most common and important imbalances that we see in clinical practice with trace minerals is excess copper and deficient zinc. So, the ideal ratio between these two, if copper is in the numerator and zinc is in the denominator, would be 0.7 to 1, which means anywhere from 70% as much copper as zinc to even amounts of each.

copper and zinc are not only minerals, but they’re also regarded as neurotransmitters in the brain. They have some of the functions of a neurotransmitter, so an imbalance in copper and zinc will lead to things like hyperactivity, ADHD, other kinds of behavioral disorders, and depression; and in fact, a lot of people who are labeled with autism and even paranoid schizophrenia, when they test their copper levels, they find out that they’re elevated. Then high copper can cause severe PMS. That’s another red flag for me where I’ll consider it. It can cause estrogen intolerance, and it can cause skin issues, so people with excess copper have a high incidence of acne or eczema, psoriasis, just sensitive skin in general, sunburn, people who are really apt to get sunburned even if they’re only out for a short period of time, headaches, poor immune function.

Magic Man wrote:Zinc increases testosterone and copper increases estrogen.


One of the most common and important imbalances that we see in clinical practice with trace minerals is excess copper and deficient zinc. So, the ideal ratio between these two, if copper is in the numerator and zinc is in the denominator, would be 0.7 to 1, which means anywhere from 70% as much copper as zinc to even amounts of each.

copper and zinc are not only minerals, but they’re also regarded as neurotransmitters in the brain. They have some of the functions of a neurotransmitter, so an imbalance in copper and zinc will lead to things like hyperactivity, ADHD, other kinds of behavioral disorders, and depression; and in fact, a lot of people who are labeled with autism and even paranoid schizophrenia, when they test their copper levels, they find out that they’re elevated. Then high copper can cause severe PMS. That’s another red flag for me where I’ll consider it. It can cause estrogen intolerance, and it can cause skin issues, so people with excess copper have a high incidence of acne or eczema, psoriasis, just sensitive skin in general, sunburn, people who are really apt to get sunburned even if they’re only out for a short period of time, headaches, poor immune function.

Good.
anyone who has more studies can be posted

Pubertal arrest due to zinc deficiency:

http://www.hormones.gr/pdf/Pubertal%20arrest%20due.pdf

We present a 19 year-old boy with short stature, pubertal arrest, iron deficiency anemia and Zn deficiency. Based on the dynamic tests, the hypogonadism seems to be due to hypothalamic dysfunction. The growth retardation was associated with low IGF-I and normal growth hormone (GH) secretion, indicating GH receptor or post receptor defect. Growth acceleration and testicular development was observed after Zn supplementation.


To take from this:

Puberty had begun as normal, but was arrested somewhere along the way. With zn supplementation his ball size increased 3x and his testosterone went from very low to 900ng/dl along with a massive increase in IGF-1. He grew 7cm in the 6 months they followed him. Zinc restarted puberty.



PostThis post by Zyzz was deleted by puanewb on Tue Mar 03, 2015 9:41 pm.
Reason: requested

groundbreaking wrote:Pubertal arrest due to zinc deficiency:

http://www.hormones.gr/pdf/Pubertal%20arrest%20due.pdf

We present a 19 year-old boy with short stature, pubertal arrest, iron deficiency anemia and Zn deficiency. Based on the dynamic tests, the hypogonadism seems to be due to hypothalamic dysfunction. The growth retardation was associated with low IGF-I and normal growth hormone (GH) secretion, indicating GH receptor or post receptor defect. Growth acceleration and testicular development was observed after Zn supplementation.


To take from this:

Puberty had begun as normal, but was arrested somewhere along the way. With zn supplementation his ball size increased 3x and his testosterone went from very low to 900ng/dl along with a massive increase in IGF-1. He grew 7cm in the 6 months they followed him. Zinc restarted puberty.

wow thanks.



PostThis post by Zyzz was deleted by puanewb on Tue Mar 03, 2015 9:41 pm.
Reason: requested

AMOGGED wrote:It better be zinc picolinate boyo

You asked what did he get in the study colez posted :
" the patient received 160mg/day
ferrous sulphate and 50mg/day Zn for 6 months"


btw why zinc picolinate? I can cancel it..

Thanks for posting. Stuff like this is why I even bother coming here. I've heard great things about a variety of minerals. It's not just zinc. Mineral supplements for anything we have a deficiency of are likely going to help a lot with both appearance and overall well-being.
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Zinc is a god of minerals. Zinc, K2, vitamin D, fish oil and calcium carbonate is a MUST stack.
-gossipping
-deepthroating slayers
-sucking the blood of less attractive males and using them as an emotional tampon to soak up all their childish emotions while denying them sex

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