10 surprising facts about rejection

Share your experiences with the opposite sex. Suggest ways to improve your success. Analyze the behavior of females in real life and online. Rant and rave about females. Show the importance of looks pertaining to attracting females and other social situations. Discuss aesthetics and the science of attractiveness. Exchange health, nutrition and looksmaxing tips.

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the ... -rejection


Guy Winch, Ph.D.
We know that rejection really hurts, but they can also inflict damage to our psychological well-being that goes well beyond mere emotional pain. Here are 10 lesser known facts that describe the various effects rejection has on our emotions, thinking, and behavior. Let’s begin by examining why rejection hurts as much as it does:

Rejection piggybacks on physical pain pathways in the brain. fMRI studies show that the same areas of the brain become activated when we experience rejection as when we experience physical pain. This is why rejection hurts so much (neurologically speaking). In fact our brains respond so similarly to rejection and physical pain that…
Tylenol reduces the emotional pain rejection elicits. In a study testing the hypothesis that rejection mimics physical pain, researchers gave some participants acetaminophen (Tylenol) before asking them to recall a painful rejection experience. The people who received Tylenol reported significantly less emotional pain than subjects who took a sugar pill. Psychologists assume that the reason for the strong link between rejection and physical pain is that…
Rejection served a vital function in our evolutionary past. In our hunter/gatherer past, being ostracized from our tribes was akin to a death sentence, as we were unlikely to survive for long alone. Evolutionary psychologists assume the brain developed an early warning system to alert us when we were at risk for ostracism. Because it was so important to get our attention, those who experienced rejection as more painful (i.e., because rejection mimicked physical pain in their brain) gained an evolutionary advantage—they were more likely to correct their behavior and consequently, more likely to remain in the tribe. Which probably also explains why…
We can relive and re-experience social pain more vividly than we can physical pain. Try recalling an experience in which you felt significant physical pain and your brain pathways will respond, "Meh." In other words, that memory alone won’t elicit physical pain. But try reliving a painful rejection (actually, don’t—just take my word for it), and you will be flooded with many of the same feelings you had at the time (and your brain will respond much as it did at the time, too). Our brain prioritizes rejection experiences because we are social animals who live in "tribes." This leads to an aspect about rejection we often overlook…
Rejection destabilizes our "Need to Belong." We all have a fundamental need to belong to a group. When we get rejected, this need becomes destabilized and the disconnection we feel adds to our emotional pain. Reconnecting with those who love us, or reaching out to members of groups to which we feel strong affinity and who value and accept us, has been found to soothe emotional pain after a rejection. Feeling alone and disconnected after a rejection, however, has an often overlooked impact on our behavior…
Rejection creates surges of anger and aggression. In 2001, the Surgeon General of the U.S. issued a report stating that rejection was a greater risk for adolescent violence than drugs, poverty, or gang membership. Countless studies have demonstrated that even mild rejections lead people to take out their aggression on innocent bystanders. School shootings, violence against women, and fired workers going "postal" are other examples of the strong link between rejection and aggression. However, much of that aggression elicited by rejection is also turned inward…
Rejections send us on a mission to seek and destroy our self-esteem. We often respond to romantic rejections by finding fault in ourselves, bemoaning all our inadequacies, kicking ourselves when we’re already down, and smacking our self-esteem into a pulp. Most romantic rejections are a matter of poor fit and a lack of chemistry, incompatible lifestyles, wanting different things at different times, or other such issues of mutual dynamics. Blaming ourselves and attacking our self-worth only deepens the emotional pain we feel and makes it harder for us to recover emotionally. But before you rush to blame yourself for...blaming yourself, keep in mind the fact that…
Rejection temporarily lowers our IQ. Being asked to recall a recent rejection experience and relive the experience was enough to cause people to score significantly lower on subsequent IQ tests, tests of short-term memory, and tests of decision making. Indeed, when we are reeling from a painful rejection, thinking clearly is just not that easy. This explains why…
Rejection does not respond to reason. Participants were put through an experiment in which they were rejected by strangers. The experiment was rigged—the "strangers" were confederates of the researchers. Surprisingly, though, even being told that the "strangers" who had "rejected" them did not actually reject them did little to ease the emotional pain participants felt. Even being told that the strangers belonged to a group they despised such as the KKK did little to soothe people's hurt feelings. Still, the news is not all bad, because…
There are ways to treat the psychological wounds rejection inflicts. It is possible to treat the emotional pain rejection elicits and to prevent the psychological, emotional, cognitive, and relationship fallouts that occur in its aftermath. To do so effectively we must address each of our psychological wounds (i.e., soothe our emotional pain, reduce our anger and aggression, protect our self-esteem, and stabilize our need to belong).



And PUA and even mainstream requires and encourages men to get rejected over and over. "Approach, approach", "Just shrug off rejection", "Man up!", "Don't be a pussy!". Approaching women and getting rejected over and over, which you always will a far majority of the time, however softly, passively or implied the rejection is hard on the psyche.

pikachu wrote:I'm dead on the inside so I don't feel shit anymore


Legit.

I feel nothing. Absolutely nothing. Stop giving people chances to reject you.

LOL at belonging. All 7+ billion of you can fuck off for all I care.

Here's to feeling nothing.

Video relate:

m.youtube.com/watch?v=98B3h4l6Ino
Image

pikachu wrote:I'm dead on the inside so I don't feel shit anymore


I'm mostly dead on the inside too and rejection doesn't hurt much anymore, but that is some what of a misnomer. I still feel pain on the inside and still feel some disappointment with rejection.



actually i think that pua advice is somehow legit. first few rejections hurt, but after some time i got used to it and i dont care that much anymore if i get rejected. learning accepting rejections is legit.
Image

LMSghost wrote: There are ways to treat the psychological wounds rejection inflicts. It is possible to treat the emotional pain rejection elicits and to prevent the psychological, emotional, cognitive, and relationship fallouts that occur in its aftermath. To do so effectively we must address each of our psychological wounds (i.e., soothe our emotional pain, reduce our anger and aggression, protect our self-esteem, and stabilize our need to belong).


You also realized that every red pill treatise ends with a blue pill bullshit statement like this?
Whimminz reactions when I try to be more "confident":
Image
PostThis post by Linger was deleted by puanewb on Tue Oct 14, 2014 6:08 pm.
Reason: Requested via Tinychat/Confirmed by PM



thats why you should become a leader of a group, not be a beta orbiter or ostracized hermit

Humiliated Sensei wrote:thats why you should become a leader of a group, not be a beta orbiter or ostracized hermit


Brb becoming a leader of a group.

Anakind wrote:
Humiliated Sensei wrote:thats why you should become a leader of a group, not be a beta orbiter or ostracized hermit


Brb becoming a leader of a group.


Hang out with people lower in LMS 3 points

its doable, also proven to raise T as a leader automatically gets the T bonus, also a winner of a competition

Humiliated Sensei wrote:
Hang out with people lower in LMS 3 points


its doable, also proven to raise T as a leader automatically gets the T bonus, also a winner of a competition


Only African village people are 3 points lower in LMS. You buy me a ticket?

Anakind wrote:
Humiliated Sensei wrote:
Hang out with people lower in LMS 3 points


its doable, also proven to raise T as a leader automatically gets the T bonus, also a winner of a competition


Only African village people are 3 points lower in LMS. You buy me a ticket?


No. But you can become my beta orbiter. Laugh at all my posts and agree with everything I write.
Help ME out at least bro, if you are 4/10 there is no hope for you anyways.

Humiliated Sensei wrote:
Anakind wrote:
Only African village people are 3 points lower in LMS. You buy me a ticket?


No. But you can become my beta orbiter. Laugh at all my posts and agree with everything I write.
Help ME out at least bro, if you are 4/10 there is no hope for you anyways.


Even if I was 7/10, there wouldn't be hope. I have Asperger's.

Anakind wrote:
Humiliated Sensei wrote:
Hang out with people lower in LMS 3 points


its doable, also proven to raise T as a leader automatically gets the T bonus, also a winner of a competition


Only African village people are 3 points lower in LMS. You buy me a ticket?



Tfw have daily access to African village people.

They see you as someone who is a full 5-10 points below them in LMS.

Anakind wrote:
Humiliated Sensei wrote:
No. But you can become my beta orbiter. Laugh at all my posts and agree with everything I write.
Help ME out at least bro, if you are 4/10 there is no hope for you anyways.


Even if I was 7/10, there wouldn't be hope. I have Asperger's.


You seem like a very neurotypical poster from your posts, some of them are good. I don't believe that is the case.

Were you officially tested?

gobman3000 wrote:I wonder how straxcity feels....

I see it in his eyes, no soul left.


Nor hair.
Image

Your life is pointless and shit unless you can date prime girls like this.

FACEandLMS wrote:
gobman3000 wrote:I wonder how straxcity feels....

I see it in his eyes, no soul left.


Nor hair.


Nothing a quick 4 hour combover preparation can't fix

LMSghost wrote:http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-squeaky-wheel/201307/10-surprising-facts-about-rejection


Guy Winch, Ph.D.
We know that rejection really hurts, but they can also inflict damage to our psychological well-being that goes well beyond mere emotional pain. Here are 10 lesser known facts that describe the various effects rejection has on our emotions, thinking, and behavior. Let’s begin by examining why rejection hurts as much as it does:

Rejection piggybacks on physical pain pathways in the brain. fMRI studies show that the same areas of the brain become activated when we experience rejection as when we experience physical pain. This is why rejection hurts so much (neurologically speaking). In fact our brains respond so similarly to rejection and physical pain that…
Tylenol reduces the emotional pain rejection elicits. In a study testing the hypothesis that rejection mimics physical pain, researchers gave some participants acetaminophen (Tylenol) before asking them to recall a painful rejection experience. The people who received Tylenol reported significantly less emotional pain than subjects who took a sugar pill. Psychologists assume that the reason for the strong link between rejection and physical pain is that…
Rejection served a vital function in our evolutionary past. In our hunter/gatherer past, being ostracized from our tribes was akin to a death sentence, as we were unlikely to survive for long alone. Evolutionary psychologists assume the brain developed an early warning system to alert us when we were at risk for ostracism. Because it was so important to get our attention, those who experienced rejection as more painful (i.e., because rejection mimicked physical pain in their brain) gained an evolutionary advantage—they were more likely to correct their behavior and consequently, more likely to remain in the tribe. Which probably also explains why…
We can relive and re-experience social pain more vividly than we can physical pain. Try recalling an experience in which you felt significant physical pain and your brain pathways will respond, "Meh." In other words, that memory alone won’t elicit physical pain. But try reliving a painful rejection (actually, don’t—just take my word for it), and you will be flooded with many of the same feelings you had at the time (and your brain will respond much as it did at the time, too). Our brain prioritizes rejection experiences because we are social animals who live in "tribes." This leads to an aspect about rejection we often overlook…
Rejection destabilizes our "Need to Belong." We all have a fundamental need to belong to a group. When we get rejected, this need becomes destabilized and the disconnection we feel adds to our emotional pain. Reconnecting with those who love us, or reaching out to members of groups to which we feel strong affinity and who value and accept us, has been found to soothe emotional pain after a rejection. Feeling alone and disconnected after a rejection, however, has an often overlooked impact on our behavior…
Rejection creates surges of anger and aggression. In 2001, the Surgeon General of the U.S. issued a report stating that rejection was a greater risk for adolescent violence than drugs, poverty, or gang membership. Countless studies have demonstrated that even mild rejections lead people to take out their aggression on innocent bystanders. School shootings, violence against women, and fired workers going "postal" are other examples of the strong link between rejection and aggression. However, much of that aggression elicited by rejection is also turned inward…
Rejections send us on a mission to seek and destroy our self-esteem. We often respond to romantic rejections by finding fault in ourselves, bemoaning all our inadequacies, kicking ourselves when we’re already down, and smacking our self-esteem into a pulp. Most romantic rejections are a matter of poor fit and a lack of chemistry, incompatible lifestyles, wanting different things at different times, or other such issues of mutual dynamics. Blaming ourselves and attacking our self-worth only deepens the emotional pain we feel and makes it harder for us to recover emotionally. But before you rush to blame yourself for...blaming yourself, keep in mind the fact that…
Rejection temporarily lowers our IQ. Being asked to recall a recent rejection experience and relive the experience was enough to cause people to score significantly lower on subsequent IQ tests, tests of short-term memory, and tests of decision making. Indeed, when we are reeling from a painful rejection, thinking clearly is just not that easy. This explains why…
Rejection does not respond to reason. Participants were put through an experiment in which they were rejected by strangers. The experiment was rigged—the "strangers" were confederates of the researchers. Surprisingly, though, even being told that the "strangers" who had "rejected" them did not actually reject them did little to ease the emotional pain participants felt. Even being told that the strangers belonged to a group they despised such as the KKK did little to soothe people's hurt feelings. Still, the news is not all bad, because…
There are ways to treat the psychological wounds rejection inflicts. It is possible to treat the emotional pain rejection elicits and to prevent the psychological, emotional, cognitive, and relationship fallouts that occur in its aftermath. To do so effectively we must address each of our psychological wounds (i.e., soothe our emotional pain, reduce our anger and aggression, protect our self-esteem, and stabilize our need to belong).


Good post, that's a great find LMS Ghost, thanks for posting what is a very accurate summation on rejection and how it affects people, especially men as they are the ones who are on the receiving end of most rejections.
This is what happens whenever I approach women.
Image
Image

Image
ucp.php?i=172
Image

Image

Image

Life long member of the escort crew

Arabcel crew

Ethnicel crew

Baldcel crew

Oldcel crew

Gymcel crew

pikachu wrote:I'm dead on the inside so I don't feel shit anymore

yet you dare to preach daily

Topic Tags

Return to Shitty Advice

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider], Google [Bot] and 100 guests